Becoming an analytics-driven organization to create value


Herman Heyns, Chris Mazzei , in collaboration with Nimbus Ninet
2015


Site version edited by:


Joaquim Cardoso MSc.
The Health Strategist — advisory consulting

Analytics Informed Health Care Unit
July 13, 2022

This is an excerpt of the publication above, focusing on the Executive Summary, and adding one example for illustration of the results.


Executive summary


How much is an organization worth?


In the past, answers to these tough questions were based on a simple analysis of the balance sheet and a focus on the company’s future expected revenues and profits. Assumptions were also made about the value of intangible assets, from intellectual capital and employee skills to customer loyalty and future growth potential, leading to highly subjective valuations.

To identify new sources of value that exist in an organization and can be exploited, and to cultivate future opportunities for value creation and protection, many forward-looking companies are turning to big data and analytics. In essence, analytics can enable an organization to effectively grow, optimize and protect value.

Firstly, big data has become an invaluable tool for creating value in a business. By providing a comprehensive view of market conditions, customer needs and preferences, and potential project risks, big data can eliminate reliance on “gut feel” decision-making. Organizations can understand and embrace emerging opportunities and align products and services with changing customer needs creating additional value for stakeholders in the process.

Secondly, big data can help organizations protect value based on effective risk mitigation and compliance with ever-changing regulations. This is especially important for companies grappling with the implications of the new European Union (EU) General Data Privacy Regulation set to be formalized by the EU in 2015.

Thirdly, analytics can help organizations find and measure intangible sources of value more effectively, bringing together hard facts from the balance sheet with a range of qualitative evidence, such as employee skills, customer sentiment, product innovation and geographical footprint. The result is a more comprehensive understanding of what drives a company’s valuation while offering a clear way to manage value and communicate it to a wide range of stakeholders and the market.

In this summary we give you an overview of research from EY and Nimbus Ninety, which looks at how companies are currently using big data analytics to find, measure, create and protect value across functional areas. Strikingly, the research shows that while 81% of organizations think data should be at the heart of every business decision, most are still using analytics in an isolated way to address specific business issues, limiting the potential value to increase performance and efficiency.

In the following sections, we look at the key challenges companies face in their quest to embrace value-driven decision-making as well as the game changing impact of the European Union directives and regulations impacting data security. Using our latest research, we hope to shed light on how businesses are working to become analytics-driven organizations. Becoming an analytics-driven organization to create value Executive summary How much is an organization worth? 01 81% of respondents agree that data should be at the heart of all decision-making.

Herman Heyns

Chris Mazzei


About the research:


A total of 270 senior executives responded to 27 questions on all aspects of their data strategy. Around 68% of respondents are active stakeholders in big data projects, and all departmental functions and industry sectors are represented, with the majority of respondents working in finance, marketing and IT, as well as in cross-departmental management roles.


81% of respondents agree that data should be at the heart of all decision-making.




KEY FINDINGS:


The top 10 drivers for your organisation to implement big data analytics


Our latest research shows businesses are not yet realizing the true potential of big data to measure, create and protect value across diverse operational areas.


32% of respondents admitted to being overwhelmed by data.


Big data ambitions versus current realities


The findings of the research show that 81% of companies understand the importance of data for improving efficiency and business performance and that most are embarking on some kind of big data strategy. 

Of respondents from companies with an annual turnover of more than £2 billion, only 3% have no big data strategy at all. 

The figure rises to 14% in the £100 million to £2 billion category and to 16% for those with annual turnover under £100 million.


While the vast majority have big data on their radar, however, only 3% describe their data strategy as “mature.” 

Among companies currently working on big data projects, just 21% are in the operational phase, showing a major gulf between companies’ big data ambitions and their current achievements.

In practice, this means that less than a third of companies are currently harnessing big data to offer services around existing business models and, for example upsell products and services to customers, while just 8% are using big data to optimize supply chain efficiency. 

Other opportunities to create value are also being missed, from improved board-level decision-making to improved management of working capital.


Drivers for big data projects


Our research sheds new light on the drivers for big data adoption. 

  • “Understanding customers better” was the most common driver for big data projects, cited by 73% of respondents as a key area where additional value could be created. 
  • “Improving products and services” came a close second, while almost half of respondents also cited “improving the management of existing data” as a key focus.
  • 35% of respondents recognize the financial value of big data, citing “to monetize existing data” as a key driver.
  • 10% were more blatant in their intention to “sort data so it can be sold to or used in partnership with a third party.”
  • 20% are using data “to improve the detection and prevention of fraud”, an increase from “7% of respondents who are aware of any specific data technologies as cited in our EY, Forensic Data Analytics Survey 2013.”

Key big data challenges


The findings of the research suggest widespread underinvestment in the structures, processes and controls needed to support value-driven decision-making. 

Poor data quality and a lack of strong data governance are undermining trust in the value of data across entire organizations, while the widespread lack of specialist big data skills makes it difficult to budget and plan for big data projects and effectively calculate ROI.

  • 32% of respondents admitted to being overwhelmed by data 
  • 33% saw organizational structure as being the key influence on success for big data projects 
  • 47% cite- “adapting organizational culture to integrate big data” as a key challenge.
  • 50% view poor data quality as a key concern, with the same percentage quoting ROI as a key challenge to projects.

The findings of the research suggest widespread underinvestment in the structures, processes and controls needed to support value-driven decision-making.


Poor data quality and a lack of strong data governance are undermining trust in the value of data across entire organizations, while the widespread lack of specialist big data skills makes it difficult to budget and plan for big data projects and effectively calculate ROI.


Bupa Case Study


Leading international health care group Bupa provides a broad range of healthcare services, support and advice to help people live longer, healthier, happier lives. 

The organization runs care homes, health centers, dental centers and hospitals, as well as providing personal and company health insurance, home health care services, health assessments and chronic disease management services. 

As well as serving 22 million customers in 190 countries, Bupa also provides a range of health services and advice that anyone can access.


Using accurate patient data, it was possible to design effective outcome-based regimens for 2,600 people attending the pilot rehabilitation course. 

“On average, the prescribed exercises helped patients reduce their oxygen use by 1.5 liters per day during the course, representing a potential, NHS-wide cost saving of £115 million a year,” says Alan. 

“More importantly, the data showed that the Bupa rehabilitation course can help to improve the physical capabilities and quality of life for COPD sufferers.”


Using accurate patient data, it was possible to design effective outcome-based regimens for 2,600 people attending the pilot rehabilitation course.

On average, the prescribed exercises helped patients reduce their oxygen use by 1.5 liters per day during the course, representing a potential, NHS-wide cost saving of £115 million a year

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